Title Instructors Location Time Description Cross listings Fulfills Registration notes Syllabus Syllabus URL
SOCI 001-401 Introduction To Sociology Benjamin J Shestakofsky MW 10:15 AM-11:15 AM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC002401 Society Sector
Cultural Diversity in the US
Registration also required for Recitation (see below) https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=SOCI001401
SOCI 001-402 Introduction To Sociology Ellen Bryer R 08:30 AM-09:30 AM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC002402 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 001-403 Introduction To Sociology R 10:15 AM-11:15 AM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC002403 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 001-404 Introduction To Sociology R 12:00 PM-01:00 PM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC002404 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 001-405 Introduction To Sociology R 01:45 PM-02:45 PM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC002405 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 001-406 Introduction To Sociology F 08:30 AM-09:30 AM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC002406 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 001-407 Introduction To Sociology F 10:15 AM-11:15 AM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. AFRC002407 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 001-601 Intro To Sociology Blair Suzanne Sackett W 05:15 PM-08:15 PM Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world. Society Sector
Cultural Diversity in the US
SOCI 006-401 Race & Ethnic Relations Tukufu Zuberi W 01:45 PM-04:45 PM The course will focus on race and ethnicity in the United States. We begin with a brief history of racial categorization and immigration to the U.S. The course continues by examining a number of topics including racial and ethnic identity, interracial and interethnic friendships and marriage, racial attitudes, mass media images, residential segregation, educational stratification, and labor market outcomes. The course will include discussions of African Americans, Whites, Hispanics, Asian Americans and multiracials. AFRC006401, ASAM006401, URBS160401 Cultural Diversity in the US
SOCI 010-001 Social Stratification Xi Song TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM In this course we study the current levels and historical trends of inequality in the United States especially in cross-national comparative perspective. We discuss causes and consequences of inequality as well as various policy efforts to deal with inequality. Topics include intergenerational social mobility, income inequality, education, gender, race and ethnicity among others. Society Sector
Cultural Diversity in the US
SOCI 028-401 Afrc Freshman Seminar Camille Charles T 01:45 PM-04:45 PM This course explores a broad set of issues defining important aspects of the Black/African American experience. In addition to the "usual suspects" (e.g., race, socioeconomic status, poverty, gender, and group culture), we also think about matters of health and well-being, the family, education, and identity in Black/African American communities. Our goal is to gain a deeper sociological understanding and appreciation of the diverse and ever-changing life experiences of Blacks/African Americans. AFRC008401 Cultural Diversity in the US Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Freshman Seminar
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=SOCI028401
SOCI 033-401 Technology & Society Jason M Chernesky TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM Technology plays an increasing role in our understandings of ourselves, our communities, and our societies, in how we think about politics and war, science and religion, work and play. Humans have made and used technologies, though, for thousands if not millions of years. In this course, we will use this history as a resource to understand how technologies affect social relations, and conversely how the culture of a society shapes the technologies it produces. Do different technologies produce or result from different economic systems like feudalism, capitalism and communism? Can specific technologies promote democratic or authoritarian politics? Do they suggest or enforce different patterns of race, class or gender relations? Among the technologies we'll consider will be large objects like cathedrals, bridges, and airplanes; small ones like guns, clocks and birth control pills; and networks like the electrical grid, the highway system and the internet. HSOC003401, STSC003401 Society Sector
SOCI 041-302 Poverty & Inequality Regina S Baker T 10:15 AM-01:15 PM Cultural Diversity in the US Course is available to Freshmen.
Freshman Seminar
SOCI 041-308 The Law in Our Lives Hocine Fetni M 05:15 PM-08:15 PM Cultural Diversity in the US Course is available to Freshmen.
Freshman Seminar
SOCI 041-310 Anxious Times: Social Change and Fear Jason S Schnittker MWF 01:45 PM-02:45 PM Cultural Diversity in the US Course is available to Freshmen.
Freshman Seminar
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=SOCI041310
SOCI 100-401 Introduction To Sociological Research Regina S Baker MW 10:15 AM-11:15 AM One of the defining characteristics of all the social sciences, including sociology, is a commitment to empirical research as the basis for knowledge. This course is designed to provide you with a basic understanding of research in the social sciences and to enable you to think like a social scientist. Through this course students will learn both the logic of sociological inquiry and the nuts and bolts of doing empirical research. We will focus on such issues as the relationship between theory and research, the logic of research design, issues of conceptualization and measurement, basic methods of data collection, and what social scientists do with data once they have collected them. By the end of the course, students will have completed sociological research projects utilizing different empirical methods, be able to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various research strategies, and read (with understanding) published accounts of social science research. HSOC100401 College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
SOCI 100-402 Sociological Research Methods Nana Akosua Adjeiwaa-Manu R 10:15 AM-11:15 AM One of the defining characteristics of all the social sciences, including sociology, is a commitment to empirical research as the basis for knowledge. This course is designed to provide you with a basic understanding of research in the social sciences and to enable you to think like a social scientist. Through this course students will learn both the logic of sociological inquiry and the nuts and bolts of doing empirical research. We will focus on such issues as the relationship between theory and research, the logic of research design, issues of conceptualization and measurement, basic methods of data collection, and what social scientists do with data once they have collected them. By the end of the course, students will have completed sociological research projects utilizing different empirical methods, be able to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various research strategies, and read (with understanding) published accounts of social science research. HSOC100402 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 100-403 Sociological Research Methods Nana Akosua Adjeiwaa-Manu R 12:00 PM-01:00 PM One of the defining characteristics of all the social sciences, including sociology, is a commitment to empirical research as the basis for knowledge. This course is designed to provide you with a basic understanding of research in the social sciences and to enable you to think like a social scientist. Through this course students will learn both the logic of sociological inquiry and the nuts and bolts of doing empirical research. We will focus on such issues as the relationship between theory and research, the logic of research design, issues of conceptualization and measurement, basic methods of data collection, and what social scientists do with data once they have collected them. By the end of the course, students will have completed sociological research projects utilizing different empirical methods, be able to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various research strategies, and read (with understanding) published accounts of social science research. HSOC100403 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 100-404 Sociological Research Methods Ellen Bryer CANCELED One of the defining characteristics of all the social sciences, including sociology, is a commitment to empirical research as the basis for knowledge. This course is designed to provide you with a basic understanding of research in the social sciences and to enable you to think like a social scientist. Through this course students will learn both the logic of sociological inquiry and the nuts and bolts of doing empirical research. We will focus on such issues as the relationship between theory and research, the logic of research design, issues of conceptualization and measurement, basic methods of data collection, and what social scientists do with data once they have collected them. By the end of the course, students will have completed sociological research projects utilizing different empirical methods, be able to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various research strategies, and read (with understanding) published accounts of social science research. HSOC100404 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 100-405 Sociological Research Methods Ellen Bryer CANCELED One of the defining characteristics of all the social sciences, including sociology, is a commitment to empirical research as the basis for knowledge. This course is designed to provide you with a basic understanding of research in the social sciences and to enable you to think like a social scientist. Through this course students will learn both the logic of sociological inquiry and the nuts and bolts of doing empirical research. We will focus on such issues as the relationship between theory and research, the logic of research design, issues of conceptualization and measurement, basic methods of data collection, and what social scientists do with data once they have collected them. By the end of the course, students will have completed sociological research projects utilizing different empirical methods, be able to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various research strategies, and read (with understanding) published accounts of social science research. HSOC100405 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 101-401 Bioethics TR 10:15 AM-11:15 AM This course will take an historical approach to the development of modern bioethics, which is the study of ethical issues in medicine and the life sciences. The first part of the course will be devoted to an introduction to the standard principles of academic bioethics and the way they have structured the field over the last 35 years. We will then consider topics to which the principles have long been applied, such as the care of gravely ill newborns, death and dying, and the ethics of research involving human subjects. The last part of the course will address more recent life sciences policy areas including genetics, cloning, stem cells, biodefense, and neuroscience in relation to national security. Throughout the course I will emphasize the interplay between the development of bioethics and its cultural context. HSOC102401 Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
SOCI 101-402 Bioethics F 10:15 AM-11:15 AM This course will take an historical approach to the development of modern bioethics, which is the study of ethical issues in medicine and the life sciences. The first part of the course will be devoted to an introduction to the standard principles of academic bioethics and the way they have structured the field over the last 35 years. We will then consider topics to which the principles have long been applied, such as the care of gravely ill newborns, death and dying, and the ethics of research involving human subjects. The last part of the course will address more recent life sciences policy areas including genetics, cloning, stem cells, biodefense, and neuroscience in relation to national security. Throughout the course I will emphasize the interplay between the development of bioethics and its cultural context. HSOC102402 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 101-403 Bioethics F 12:00 PM-01:00 PM This course will take an historical approach to the development of modern bioethics, which is the study of ethical issues in medicine and the life sciences. The first part of the course will be devoted to an introduction to the standard principles of academic bioethics and the way they have structured the field over the last 35 years. We will then consider topics to which the principles have long been applied, such as the care of gravely ill newborns, death and dying, and the ethics of research involving human subjects. The last part of the course will address more recent life sciences policy areas including genetics, cloning, stem cells, biodefense, and neuroscience in relation to national security. Throughout the course I will emphasize the interplay between the development of bioethics and its cultural context. HSOC102403 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 101-404 Bioethics F 12:00 PM-01:00 PM This course will take an historical approach to the development of modern bioethics, which is the study of ethical issues in medicine and the life sciences. The first part of the course will be devoted to an introduction to the standard principles of academic bioethics and the way they have structured the field over the last 35 years. We will then consider topics to which the principles have long been applied, such as the care of gravely ill newborns, death and dying, and the ethics of research involving human subjects. The last part of the course will address more recent life sciences policy areas including genetics, cloning, stem cells, biodefense, and neuroscience in relation to national security. Throughout the course I will emphasize the interplay between the development of bioethics and its cultural context. HSOC102404 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 101-405 Bioethics F 01:45 PM-02:45 PM This course will take an historical approach to the development of modern bioethics, which is the study of ethical issues in medicine and the life sciences. The first part of the course will be devoted to an introduction to the standard principles of academic bioethics and the way they have structured the field over the last 35 years. We will then consider topics to which the principles have long been applied, such as the care of gravely ill newborns, death and dying, and the ethics of research involving human subjects. The last part of the course will address more recent life sciences policy areas including genetics, cloning, stem cells, biodefense, and neuroscience in relation to national security. Throughout the course I will emphasize the interplay between the development of bioethics and its cultural context. HSOC102405 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 111-401 Health of Populations Irma Elo MW 03:30 PM-04:30 PM This course is designed to introduce students to the quantitative study of factors that influence the health of populations. Topics to be addressed include methods for characterizing levels of health in populations, comparative and historical perspectives on population health, health disparities, health policy issues and the effectiveness of interventions for enhancing the health of populations. These topics will be addressed both for developed and developing world populations. The course will focus on specific areas of health and some of the major issues and conclusions pertaining to those domains. Areas singled out for attention include chronic diseases and their major risk factors, such as smoking, physical activity, dietary factors and obesity. Throughout the course, the focus will be on determining the quality of evidence for health policy and understanding the manner in which it was generated. HSOC111401 College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
SOCI 111-402 Health of Populations F 08:30 AM-09:30 AM This course is designed to introduce students to the quantitative study of factors that influence the health of populations. Topics to be addressed include methods for characterizing levels of health in populations, comparative and historical perspectives on population health, health disparities, health policy issues and the effectiveness of interventions for enhancing the health of populations. These topics will be addressed both for developed and developing world populations. The course will focus on specific areas of health and some of the major issues and conclusions pertaining to those domains. Areas singled out for attention include chronic diseases and their major risk factors, such as smoking, physical activity, dietary factors and obesity. Throughout the course, the focus will be on determining the quality of evidence for health policy and understanding the manner in which it was generated. HSOC111402 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 111-403 Health of Populations F 10:15 AM-11:15 AM This course is designed to introduce students to the quantitative study of factors that influence the health of populations. Topics to be addressed include methods for characterizing levels of health in populations, comparative and historical perspectives on population health, health disparities, health policy issues and the effectiveness of interventions for enhancing the health of populations. These topics will be addressed both for developed and developing world populations. The course will focus on specific areas of health and some of the major issues and conclusions pertaining to those domains. Areas singled out for attention include chronic diseases and their major risk factors, such as smoking, physical activity, dietary factors and obesity. Throughout the course, the focus will be on determining the quality of evidence for health policy and understanding the manner in which it was generated. HSOC111403 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 115-401 American Race: A Philadelphia Story (SNF Paideia Program Course) Fariha Khan TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM This course proposes an examination of race with a two-pronged approach: one that broadly links the study of race in the United States with a multi-disciplinary approach and also simultaneously situates specific conversations within the immediate location of Philadelphia, home to the University. The broad historical examination advances key concepts of race and racialization, explores key theoretical methodologies, and highlights major scholarly works. For example, students will engage with the study of race through Africana Studies, Asian American Studies, and through Latin American & Latinx Studies. Readings and methodologies will introduce students to critical issues in education, in literature, in sociology, and with methods in oral history, archival work, and ethnography. Most importantly, this extensive approach highlights the impact of race across multiple communities including Black Americans, immigrant populations, and communities that are marginalized to emphasize connections, relationships, and shared solidarity. Students are intellectually pushed to see the linkages and the impacts of racism across and among all Americans historically and presently. As each theme is introduced a direct example from Philadelphia will be discussed. The combination of the national discourse on race, with an intimate perspective from the City of Philadelphia, engages students both intellectually and civically. The course will be led by Fariha Khan but guest instructors with varied disciplinary backgrounds and guest speakers from local community organizations. Each instructor not only brings specific disciplinary expertise, but also varied community engagement experience. LALS115401, ASAM115401, URBS115401, SAST115401 Designated SNF Paideia Program Course https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=SOCI115401
SOCI 117-001 Work in A Changing World Robin Lisa Leidner TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM The material world is shaped and maintained through work, but so is the social world. How work is organized, allocated, and rewarded determines the opportunities people have for developing their own capacities, the kinds of ties they will have with others, and how much control they will have over their own lives. We will consider various sociological perspectives on work and compare alternative ways of organizing work, with a focus on the contemporary United States.
SOCI 120-401 Social Statistics: Introduction To Social Statistics Camille Charles MW 10:15 AM-11:15 AM This course offers a basic introduction to the application/interpretation of statistical analysis in sociology. Upon completion, you should be familiar with a variety of basic statistical techniques that allow examination of interesting social questions. We begin by learning to describe the characteristics of groups, followed by a discussion of how to examine and generalize about relationships between the characteristics of groups. Emphasis is placed on the understanding/interpretation of statistics used to describe and make generalizations about group characteristics. In addition to hand calculations, you will also become familiar with using PCs to run statistical tests. AFRC120401 College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Registration also required for Recitation (see below) https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=SOCI120401
SOCI 120-402 Social Statistics Samantha Love R 10:15 AM-11:15 AM This course offers a basic introduction to the application/interpretation of statistical analysis in sociology. Upon completion, you should be familiar with a variety of basic statistical techniques that allow examination of interesting social questions. We begin by learning to describe the characteristics of groups, followed by a discussion of how to examine and generalize about relationships between the characteristics of groups. Emphasis is placed on the understanding/interpretation of statistics used to describe and make generalizations about group characteristics. In addition to hand calculations, you will also become familiar with using PCs to run statistical tests. AFRC120402 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 120-403 Social Statistics Samantha Love R 12:00 PM-01:00 PM This course offers a basic introduction to the application/interpretation of statistical analysis in sociology. Upon completion, you should be familiar with a variety of basic statistical techniques that allow examination of interesting social questions. We begin by learning to describe the characteristics of groups, followed by a discussion of how to examine and generalize about relationships between the characteristics of groups. Emphasis is placed on the understanding/interpretation of statistics used to describe and make generalizations about group characteristics. In addition to hand calculations, you will also become familiar with using PCs to run statistical tests. AFRC120403 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 120-404 Social Statistics Allison Nicole Dunatchik F 08:30 AM-09:30 AM This course offers a basic introduction to the application/interpretation of statistical analysis in sociology. Upon completion, you should be familiar with a variety of basic statistical techniques that allow examination of interesting social questions. We begin by learning to describe the characteristics of groups, followed by a discussion of how to examine and generalize about relationships between the characteristics of groups. Emphasis is placed on the understanding/interpretation of statistics used to describe and make generalizations about group characteristics. In addition to hand calculations, you will also become familiar with using PCs to run statistical tests. AFRC120404 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 120-405 Social Statistics Allison Nicole Dunatchik F 10:15 AM-11:15 AM This course offers a basic introduction to the application/interpretation of statistical analysis in sociology. Upon completion, you should be familiar with a variety of basic statistical techniques that allow examination of interesting social questions. We begin by learning to describe the characteristics of groups, followed by a discussion of how to examine and generalize about relationships between the characteristics of groups. Emphasis is placed on the understanding/interpretation of statistics used to describe and make generalizations about group characteristics. In addition to hand calculations, you will also become familiar with using PCs to run statistical tests. AFRC120405 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 125-001 Sociological Theory Stephen R. Viscelli MT 07:00 PM-08:30 PM This course will cover the founding classics of the sociological tradition including works of Tocqueville, Marx and Engels, Weber, Durkheim, Mauss, Simmel, and G.H.Mead. We will also examine how the major traditions have continued and transformed into theories of conflict, domination, resistance and social change; social solidarity, ritual and symbolism; symbolic interactionist and phenomenological theory of discourse, self and mind. This course satisfies the theory requirement for sociology majors.
SOCI 128-001 Basic Demog Methods Zohra Ansari-Thomas MW 08:30 AM-10:00 AM This course provides an introduction to basic demographic concepts, data, indicators, and techniques. The course emphasizes hands-on applications of techniques in the analysis of population dynamics in the U.S. and elsewhere. Students will learn about the main sources of demographic data, including censuses, surveys, and vital statistics, and methods to estimate demographic processes (e.g. mortality, fertility). Students will leave the course with a solid grounding in a) the sources and limitations of demographic data; b) the construction of basic demographic indicators; and c) appropriate use of basic demographic techniques to answer questions about human populations. College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=SOCI128001
SOCI 137-401 Sociology of Media and Popular Culture David I Grazian MW 10:15 AM-11:15 AM This course relies on a variety of sociological perspectives to examine the role of media and popular culture in society, with a particular emphasis on the power of the mass media industry, the relationship between cultural consumption and status, and the social organization of leisure activities from sports to shopping. URBS137401 Society Sector Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
SOCI 137-402 The Sociology of Media and Popular Culture Alejandra Regla-Vargas R 10:15 AM-11:15 AM This course relies on a variety of sociological perspectives to examine the role of media and popular culture in society, with a particular emphasis on the power of the mass media industry, the relationship between cultural consumption and status, and the social organization of leisure activities from sports to shopping. URBS137402 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 137-403 The Sociology of Media and Popular Culture Alejandra Regla-Vargas R 12:00 PM-01:00 PM This course relies on a variety of sociological perspectives to examine the role of media and popular culture in society, with a particular emphasis on the power of the mass media industry, the relationship between cultural consumption and status, and the social organization of leisure activities from sports to shopping. URBS137403 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 137-404 The Sociology of Media and Popular Culture Jack Raymond Thornton F 08:30 AM-09:30 AM This course relies on a variety of sociological perspectives to examine the role of media and popular culture in society, with a particular emphasis on the power of the mass media industry, the relationship between cultural consumption and status, and the social organization of leisure activities from sports to shopping. URBS137404 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 137-405 The Sociology of Media and Popular Culture Jack Raymond Thornton F 10:15 AM-11:15 AM This course relies on a variety of sociological perspectives to examine the role of media and popular culture in society, with a particular emphasis on the power of the mass media industry, the relationship between cultural consumption and status, and the social organization of leisure activities from sports to shopping. URBS137405 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 152-401 American Health Policy Andria B. Johnson TR 01:45 PM-02:45 PM This lecture course will introduce students to a broad range of topics that fall under the heading of American health policy. Its main emphasis will be on the history of health care in America from the U.S. Civil War to Obamacare. The primary objective of the course will be to consider why the U.S., until very recently, remained one of the only industrialized nations to have a private, non-nationalized health care system. Some of the themes addressed include: private health insurance(such as Blue Cross/Blue Shield), industrial health and workmen's compensation, the welfare state (in Europe, Canada, and the U.S.), women's health, especially maternal and infant care programs, Medicare/Medicaid, the Clinton Health Plan of 1993, injured soldiers and the Veterans Administration. HSOC150401 Registration also required for Recitation (see below) https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=SOCI152401
SOCI 152-402 American Health Policy R 05:15 PM-06:15 PM This lecture course will introduce students to a broad range of topics that fall under the heading of American health policy. Its main emphasis will be on the history of health care in America from the U.S. Civil War to Obamacare. The primary objective of the course will be to consider why the U.S., until very recently, remained one of the only industrialized nations to have a private, non-nationalized health care system. Some of the themes addressed include: private health insurance(such as Blue Cross/Blue Shield), industrial health and workmen's compensation, the welfare state (in Europe, Canada, and the U.S.), women's health, especially maternal and infant care programs, Medicare/Medicaid, the Clinton Health Plan of 1993, injured soldiers and the Veterans Administration. HSOC150402 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 152-403 American Health Policy F 10:15 AM-11:15 AM This lecture course will introduce students to a broad range of topics that fall under the heading of American health policy. Its main emphasis will be on the history of health care in America from the U.S. Civil War to Obamacare. The primary objective of the course will be to consider why the U.S., until very recently, remained one of the only industrialized nations to have a private, non-nationalized health care system. Some of the themes addressed include: private health insurance(such as Blue Cross/Blue Shield), industrial health and workmen's compensation, the welfare state (in Europe, Canada, and the U.S.), women's health, especially maternal and infant care programs, Medicare/Medicaid, the Clinton Health Plan of 1993, injured soldiers and the Veterans Administration. HSOC150403 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 161-401 Information Age Jason M Chernesky TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM Certain new technologies are greeted with claims that, for good or ill, they must transform our society. The two most recent: the computer and the Internet. But the series of social, economic and technological developments that underlie what is often called the Information Revolution include much more than just the computer. In this course, we explore the history of information technology and its role in contemporary society. We will explore both the technologies themselves--calculating machines, punched card tabulators, telegraph and telephone networks, differential analyzers, digital computers, and many others--and their larger social, economic and political contexts. To understand the roots of these ideas we look at the prehistory of the computer, at the idea of the post-industrial or information society, at parallels with earlier technologies and at broad historical currents in the United States and the world. STSC160401 Humanities & Social Science Sector
SOCI 200-401 Criminal Justice Maria Cuellar MW 01:45 PM-03:15 PM This course examines how the criminal justice system responds to crime in society. The course reviews the historical development of criminal justice agencies in the United States and Europe and the available scientific evidence on the effect these agencies have on controlling crime. The course places an emphasis on the functional creation of criminal justice agencies and the discretionary role decision makers in these agencies have in deciding how to enforce criminal laws and whom to punish. Evidence on how society measures crime and the role that each major criminal justice agency plays in controlling crime is examined from the perspective of crime victims, police, prosecutors, jurors, judges, prison officials, probation officers and parole board members. Using the model of social policy evaluation, the course asks students to consider how the results of criminal justice could be more effectively delivered to reduce the social and economic costs of crime. CRIM200401 Society Sector https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=SOCI200401
SOCI 222-301 Field Methods of Sociological Research Stephen R. Viscelli T 12:00 PM-03:00 PM This course is designed to introduce students to field methods in sociological research, with a focus on participant-observation and interviewing. During this course, students will read original research based on field methods and discuss their strengths, limitations, and ethical dilemmas. Most importantly, students will design their own research projects and become ethnographers and interviewers. Students will be guided through the fieldwork process from data collection to analysis, and will turn in multiple assignments and original research paper.
SOCI 235-401 Law and Social Change Hocine Fetni TR 05:15 PM-06:45 PM Beginning with discussion of various perspectives on social change and law, this course then examines in detail the interdependent relationship between changes in legal and societal institutions. Emphasis will be placed on (1) how and when law can be an instrument for social change, and (2) how and when social change can cause legal change. In the assessment of this relationship, emphasis will be on the laws of the United States. However, laws of other countries and international law relevant to civil liberties, economic, social and political progress will be studied. Throughout the course, discussions will include legal controversies relevant to social change such as issues of race, gender and the law. Other issues relevanat to State-Building and development will discussed. A comparative framework will be used in the analysis of this interdependent relationship between law and social change. AFRC235401 Cultural Diversity in the US
SOCI 238-401 Media/Cult/Soci/China Guobin Yang MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM This course studies contemporary Chinese media, culture, and society in the context of globalization. Major topics include Internet expression and censorship, mass media commercialization, entertainment media, middle class and consumerism, environmental degradation, new forms of inequality, and civil society and popular protest. Taking a sociological approach, this course introduces methods and theories for analyzing media, institutions, inequality, and social change. COMM203401
SOCI 249-301 Coming of Age East Asia: Work, Love and Independence: Coming of Age in East Asia Hyunjoon Park W 01:45 PM-04:45 PM How do millennials in East Asia make transition to adulthood? What does it mean to become an adult in East Asia? Under the contexts of rapid educational expansion, growing economic inequality, and shifting cultural norms, Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Taiwanese young people are facing various challenges in coming of age. The dim outlook for landing a full-time, stable, and good job, for instance, had led many Korean millennials to 'give up' dating, marriage, and parenting, considered as major milestones of adulthood. More and more young millennials delay departure from their parental home. At the same time, East Asian millennials are highly educated, tech-savvy, and culturally diverse, distinguishing themselves from older generations. This course first offers an overall view of changing patterns and timing of transition to adulthood in East Asia (particularly compared to experiences of young adults in the United States and Europe). In the class, students will be able to identify demographic, cultural and economic factors that shape specific pathways to adulthood in East Asia. The course highlights diversity and heterogeneity in stories of coming of age among East Asian millennials from different socioeconomic, cultural, and demographic backgrounds. Diverse narratives and perceptions of adulthood in East Asia are discussed.
SOCI 254-401 Cities,Suburbs,Regions Karen Lisa Black T 01:45 PM-04:45 PM This course will explore the political, economic, social, and demographic forces impacting development patterns in metropolitan areas, with a particular focus on Philadelphia. We will examine the government policies, economic forces, and social attitudes that affect the way a region grows, and the impact of these forces on poverty, equity and segregation. Specific topics to be discussed include the factors that make a region competitive, the city's changing role in the region, the impact place has on opportunity, and approaches to revitalizing and improving communities. URBS253401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=SOCI254401
SOCI 258-401 Global Urban Education Alec Ian Gershberg W 01:45 PM-04:45 PM This course examines the demographic, social, and economic trends impacting the growth of global cities--providing the context for global urban education. Through the dual lens of globalization and local urban culture, we explore relationships between urban education and economic development, democratic citizenship, social movements, social inclusion, equity, and quality of urban life. We consider key historical legacies (e.g., Colonialism), informal settlements and "slums," the rise of the "knowledge economy", and the role of international aid. Additional topics include: early childhood; gender equity; youth culture; impacts of crisis and war; urban refugees; teacher training and identity; accountability & governance; information & computer technology; religion, indigenous cultures, and language identity; & the role of the private sector and school choice. We focus on cities like Sao Paolo, Mexico City, Shanghai, Hong Kong, Ho Chi Minh City, Johannesburg, Lagos, Nairobi, Jakarta, Mumbai, Lahore, Tehran, and Cairo, and draw comparisons to cities like New York, London, Paris and Tokyo. URBS258401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=SOCI258401
SOCI 266-401 Latinos in United States Emilio Alberto Parrado M 01:45 PM-04:45 PM This course presents a broad overview of the Latino population in the United States that focuses on the economic and sociological aspects of Latino immigration and assimilation. Topics to be covered include: construction of Latino identity, the history of U.S. Latino immigration, Latino family patterns and household structure, Latino educational attainment. Latino incorporation into the U.S. labor force, earnings and economic well-being among Latino-origin groups, assimilation and the second generation. The course will stress the importance of understanding Latinos within the overall system of race and ethnic relations in the U.S., as well as in comparison with previous immigration flows, particularly from Europe. We will pay particular attention to the economic impact of Latino immigration on both the U.S. receiving and Latin American sending communities, and the efficacy and future possibilities of U.S. immigration policy. Within all of these diverse topics, we will stress the heterogeneity of the Latino population according to national origin groups (i.e. Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, and other Latinos), as well as generational differences between immigrants and the native born. LALS235401 Cultural Diversity in the US An Academically Based Community Serv Course
SOCI 267-301 Sociology of Education Annette Lareau T 01:45 PM-04:45 PM Schools play a crucial role in shaping inequality. In the United States, every child is told that anyone can grow up to become President. Yet, accidents of birth matter as children born to working-class families often have vastly different educational experiences than do the children born to upper-middle-class families. This course will provide an overview of educational institutions and the experiences of children within them. We will learn about social class and race differences in children's experiences before school, during elementary school and secondary school, and in college. For example, racial inequality increases the more years children spend in school. There are also dramatic differences in the character of school experiences for children from different racial and ethnic groups. Learning about schools also helps us understand other social institutions including inequality in neighborhoods, family life, government policies, and the labor market. An Academically Based Community Serv Course https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=SOCI267301
SOCI 270-401 The Immigrant City Domenic Vitiello M 01:45 PM-04:45 PM This course focuses on immigrant communities in United States cities and suburbs. We survey migration and community experiences among a broad range of ethnic groups in different city and suburban neighborhoods. Class readings, discussions, and visits to Philadelphia neighborhoods explore themes including labor markets, commerce, housing, civil society, racial and ethnic relations, integration, refugee resettlement, and local, state, and national immigration policies. The class introduces students to a variety of social science approaches to studying social groups and neighborhoods, including readings in sociology, geography, anthropology, social history, and political science. Ultimately, the class aims to help students develop: 1) a broad knowledge of immigration and its impacts on U.S. cities and regions; 2) a comparative understanding of diverse migrant and receiving communities; and 3) familiarity with policies and institutions that seek to influence immigration and immigrant communities. LALS273401, URBS270401 Society Sector
Cultural Diversity in the US
Permission Needed From Instructor https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=SOCI270401
SOCI 277-401 Mental Illness Jason S Schnittker MWF 10:15 AM-11:15 AM This course is designed to give a general overview of how sociologists study mental illness. We will be concerned with describing the contributions of sociological research and exploring how these contributions differ from those of psychology, psychiatry, and social work. This overview will be done in three parts: we will discuss (i) what "mental illness" is, (ii) precisely how many Americans are mentally ill, (iii) how social factors (e.g. race, gender, class) and social arrangements (e.g. social networks) lead to mental illness, and (iv) how we as a society respond to and treat the mentally ill. Throughout the course, we will be concerned with uncovering the assumptions behind different definitions of mental health and exploring their political, social, and legal implications. HSOC277401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=SOCI277401
SOCI 281-301 Contemporary Immigration: Contemporary Immigration in the U.S. Robert G. Gonzales TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM While this course will engage immigration issues more broadly, we will centrally focus on questions of immigrant incorporation and the effects of U.S immigration policy. We will start with the broad question of what should be done about the estimated 10.5 million undocumented immigrants living in the United States. Then, we will take a deeper look at the ways in which macro-level forces such as our laws and institutions shape the micro-level, everyday lives of undocumented immigrants and those living in mixed-status families. We will pay close attention to the circumstances of young people, including their experiences of exclusion and belonging across social and educational contexts. More specifically, we will examine how these factors might affect young people's development, schooling experiences, academic trajectories and aspirations, assimilation and ethnic identity, family dynamics, civic engagement, and employment.
SOCI 296-401 Demog, Econ, Soc Rel Hans-Peter Kohler T 10:15 AM-01:15 PM The course investigates economic and social determinants of fertility, mortality, and migration, and it discusses the effects of population variables on economic and social conditions, including economic and social development. Topics discussed in the course include: How do economic changes affect marriage, divorce, and child bearing decisions? How do households make decisions about transfers and requests? How can economic and sociological approaches be combined in explanatory models of demography change? How does immigration to the US affect the ethnic composition of the population, the earnings of native workers, taxes on natives, and the macro-economy? What causes the aging of populations, and how will population aging affect the economies of industrial nations, and in particular, pension programs like Social Security? What accounts for the rise in women's participation in the wage labor force over the past century? How are family composition and poverty interrelated? Does rapid population growth slow economic development with low income countries? In addition to these topics, the course also covers selected methods not included in DEMG/SOCI 535/536 and 609. SOCI796401, DEMG796401
SOCI 300-301 Thesis Workshop Chenoa A. Flippen R 03:30 PM-05:00 PM The purpose of this course is to guide senior sociology majors in writing a research proposal for a senior honors thesis. Students will learn about various research approaches, how to write a focused literature review, and kinds of data necessary to answer a wide variety of research questions, including their own. Throughout the course, students will work on designing a research question, generation researchable hypotheses, and coming up with a design for their proposed study. The final paper for this course will be a research proposal that is the basis for students' independent research project. This course satisfies the research requirement for sociology majors and is designed primarily for seniors who are planning to write an honors thesis. Permission Needed From Department
Majors Only
SOCI 307-401 Race, Science & Justice: Race, Science and Justice Dorothy E Roberts MW 05:15 PM-06:15 PM AFRC307401 Cultural Diversity in the US Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
SOCI 307-402 Race, Science & Justice Rebecca Anna Schut R 08:30 AM-09:30 AM AFRC307402 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 307-403 Race, Science & Justice Rebecca Anna Schut R 10:15 AM-11:15 AM AFRC307403 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
SOCI 425-401 Latinx Cultural History Johnny Irizarry T 05:15 PM-08:15 PM This course takes a multi-disciplinary approach to the study of the resiliency and impact of Latinx cultural and artistic contributions, esthetics, expressions and institution building in the United States from the Civil Rights Era to the present. We will explore how Latinxs culturally define being "American", and how their artistic expressions fit and influence the creativity and productivity of American and global arts & cultural expressions. We will also examine Latinx interactions of race, culture, society, economy and politics in the U.S. LALS425401
SOCI 430-301 Korean Culture and Society: Learning Through Data Ji Hye Kim TR 03:30 PM-05:00 PM Upper level advance topics vary from semester to semester. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=SOCI430301
SOCI 456-401 Just Futures Seminar II Paulo Ramos TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM The objective of this seminar is to provide to the students an overview of the history of black activism in Brazil. We will examine several forms of racial conflict, focusing on the afro-Brazilian ways of organization. We will explore the main periods and organizations of black activism, such as the abolitionism, the Brazilian Black Front, the Experimental Black Theater, the Black Unified Movement and the Quilombolas' movement. Through this exploration, the classes will investigate the relationship between black organizations, black thinkers and the circulation of black ideas across Americas, Africa, and Europe. We will also examine how the Brazilian black movement has elaborated values of democracy and equality, handling notions of class, race and nationality. AFRC456401, LALS356401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=SOCI456401
SOCI 517-401 Work and Identity Robin Lisa Leidner W 01:45 PM-04:45 PM The thinkers whose work formed the foundations of sociological theory considered the nature of the relationship between work and identity key to understanding social solidarity, power, and historical change. In recent years, the division of labor, structures of work, and employment relations have all been undergoing rapid change, necessarily affecting the possibilities for constructing identity through work. This seminar examines how changes in the nature and organization of work have reshaped the relationship between work and identity. GSWS517401
SOCI 533-401 Soci Race and Ethnic: Sociology of Race and Ethnicity Courtney E Boen F 01:45 PM-04:45 PM Race and ethnicity are, above all, both converge as system of ideas by which men and women imagine the human body and their relationships within society. In this course we will question the concept of race and ethnicity and their place in modern society (1500 - 2020). While the course reviews the pre-1500 literature our focus will be on the last 500 years. This course reviews the research that has contributed to the ideas about ethnicity and race in human society. The review covers the discourse on race in political propaganda, religious doctrine, philosophy, history, biology and other human sciences. LALS533401, AFRC533401 For PhD Students Only
SOCI 567-401 Urban Sociology David I Grazian M 01:45 PM-04:45 PM This course will investigate the urban structures and processes which characterize the social and cultural milieu of the contemporary American city. Specific course topics will include the social organization of urban subcultures and neighborhood communities, the cultural consequences of gentrification and racial segregation, the reputation of cities in the public imagination, and the commodification of the urban landscape. URBS567401 Undergraduates Need Permission
SOCI 571-401 Post-Soc Gender & Health Ekaterina Borozdina R 08:30 AM-11:30 AM In terms of gender and health arrangements, post-socialist societies have provided through the course of their history examples both of radical empowerment and of evident discrimination, rapid emancipation and conservative backlashes. Social policy researchers frequently refer to this as a sui generis social laboratory, where health and gender policy experiments have taken place. This course aims to examine the premises and societal outcomes of such 'experiments' both on the empirical and conceptual levels. The course pursues two interconnected goals (1) to explore the specificities of gender and health in post-socialist societies, i.e. to consider how these phenomena are grounded in and affected by the political and institutional transition from state socialism; (2) to explore theoretical insights that social studies of the post-socialist experience provide for our understanding of health and gender. The course is structured thematically and chronologically. By tracing transformations of socialist and post-socialist gender order the first part of the course introduces students to the political and institutional context of societies under consideration. The second part of the course discusses social science categories that are used to analyze gender and health (medical professionalism, medical knowledge, emotions in healthcare, etc.) and examines, how attention to socialist and post-socialist experience can enhance our conceptualizations. The third part is devoted to different dimensions of health and gender inequalities on post-socialist space. Empirical researches discussed in this part are mostly concerned with the case of Russia, but are not limited to it. Generally, the course builds into the discussion on what analytical results can be gained through comparing health and gender in post-socialist and 'Western' contexts, and what variations between and within post-socialist societies exist. This is an introductory level graduate course. REES571401
SOCI 612-401 Categorical Data Analyss Xi Song TR 03:30 PM-05:00 PM This course deals with techniques for analyzing multivariate data which the dependent variable is a set of categories (a dichotomy or polytomy). Topics will include linear probability models, logit (logistic) regression models, probit models, logit analysis of contingency tables, cumulative logit and probit (for ordinal data), multinomial logit, conditional logit (discrete choice), unobserved heterogeneity, log-linear models, square tables, response-based sampling, and repeated measures. Methods will be illustrated using the Stata System. There will be several assignments using Stata to analyze data provided by the instructor. DEMG612401
SOCI 620-301 Sociological Research II Wendy Roth W 03:30 PM-06:30 PM This course is intended to aid in the selection, framing, writing and revising of sociological dissertation proposals. It is also intended to provide a forum for the presentation of dissertation research in progress. The goal is to provide a forum for the acquisition of professional socialization in sociology. We will discuss the framing of research questions, the design of research strategies, and the writing of dissertation proposals. We will discuss the process of submitting manuscripts for conferences and journals, preparing a curriculum vitae, job search strategies, and preparing for effective colloquium presentations. We will also review articles currently under review at the American Sociological Review. It is expected that third year graduate students in Sociology will enroll in this class. Open to third-year graduate students. For PhD Students Only
Majors Only
SOCI 628-401 Migration & Development Domenic Vitiello CANCELED Human migration is one of the most important phenomena driving urban, social community and economic development. This course focuses on the ways that migrants and community, government, and private institutions work to influence development around the world. We explore a range of large- and small-scale economic development, social and community development. After a brief introduction to histories and theories of migration and development, our major themes include: Local revitalization, labor and housing markets, workforce and enterprise development; Diaspora-led transational development, including remittances, hometown and country associations, and transnational advocacy and community orgnaizing; The work of instituions, governments, and private sector firms in sending and receiving nations that influence migration and development. Readings are drawn from a variety of social sciences, plannning and development studies, including from academic and practice. Guests from local and transnational development organizations will visit the class. Assignments include short papers on the readings and a research paper or project designed by each student in consultation with the instructor. Ultimately, the course aims to help students develop: 1) a broad knowledge of migration and development in geographic and institutional settings around the world; 2) an in-depth understanding of community and economic development practices in migrant sending and receiving communities; and 3) familiarity with social science approaches to evaluating the dynamics and impacts of migration and development. CPLN628401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=SOCI628401
SOCI 708-401 Second-Year Research Seminar II Annette Lareau W 01:45 PM-04:45 PM Demography 708 is the second part of a two-course sequence designed to introduce and familiarize second year students with current norms for academic research, presentation and publishing in the field of Demography. In Demg708 students are expected to finalize the analyses and to complete their second year research paper. This is a required course for second year demography students. Others interested in enrolling in the course may do so with the permission of the Chair of the Graduate Group in Demography. DEMG708401 For PhD Students Only
Majors Only
SOCI 796-401 Demog, Econ, Soc Rel: Demographic, Economic, and Social Interrelations Hans-Peter Kohler T 10:15 AM-01:15 PM The course investigates economic and social determinants of fertility, mortality, and migration, and it discusses the effects of population variables on economic and social conditions, including economic and social development. Topics discussed in the course include: How do economic changes affect marriage, divorce, and child bearing decisions? How do households make decisions about transfers and requests? How can economic and sociological approaches be combined in explanatory models of demography change? How does immigration to the US affect the ethnic composition of the population, the earnings of native workers, taxes on natives, and the macro-economy? What causes the aging of populations, and how will population aging affect the economies of industrial nations, and in particular, pension programs like Social Security? What accounts for the rise in women's participation in the wage labor force over the past century? How are family composition and poverty interrelated? Does rapid population growth slow economic development with low income countries? In addition to these topics, the course also covers selected methods not included in DEMG/SOCI 535/536 and 609 DEMG796401, SOCI296401 For PhD Students Only
SOCI 995-023 Dissertation Michel Guillot